Plane crashed, mail survived!

Many airplane accidents and crashes occurred in history. But what happened with the mail, the covers and the postcards that was on those planes?

Let us tell a story of one of these…

The following cover departed from BOMBAY FOREIGN 1936.1st, India with a final destination to Sussex, England. The cover made a transit stop in ALEXANDRIA. Then changing plane departed for a second transit destination to Brindisi, Italy with the hydroplane SCIPIO.

The flight initiated but the flying boat had engine troubles and had to make a forced landing in Mirabella Bay in Crete, Greece. Attempting this landing a sudden cross wind swung the plane around, it crashed and sank in a few minutes. Two passengers were killed in the crash and one was seriously injured. The 38 postal bags were recovered and dried.

All covers canceled with the 2 line cancellation “DAMAGED BY SEA WATER”.  The stamps are missing on nearly all covers. Very few are known today. One of them is the following… This cover is currently for sale on eCharta!

An exciting paper survival history in 1936!

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Splashdown of Apollo 12

Apollo 12 was the sixth manned flight in the United States Apollo program and the second mission to land on the Moon. It was launched on November 14, 1969 from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida known as Cape Canaveral four months after Apollo 11. Mission commander Charles “Pete” Conrad and Lunar Module Pilot Alan L. Bean performed just over one day and seven hours of lunar surface activity while Command Module Pilot Richard F. Gordon remained in lunar orbit waiting for the other guys to come back.

The landing site for the mission was located in the southeastern portion of the Ocean of Storms in our moon. Unlike the first landing on Apollo 11, Conrad and Bean achieved a precise landing at the site of the Surveyor 3, which had landed on April 20, 1967. They carried the first color television camera to the lunar surface on an Apollo flight, but transmission was lost after Bean accidentally destroyed the camera by pointing it at the Sun. On the second extravehicular activity, they examined the unmanned Surveyor III spacecraft. The television camera and several other components were taken from Surveyor III and brought back to earth for scientific analysis.

The mission ended on November 24, 1969 with a successful splashdown. An exciting time for humanity!

Some paper ideas from the same date from the past!
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1904 St. Louis 3rd Olympic games

The map, the official poster and a nice postcard from the Olympics in St. Louis

The 1904 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the III Olympiad, was an international multi-sport event which was celebrated in St. Louis, Missouri, in the United States from July 1 to November 23, 1904, at what is now known as Francis Field on the campus of Washington University in St. Louis. St. Louis organizers repeated the mistakes made at the 1900 Summer Olympics organized in Paris. Competitions were compacted to a side-show of the World’s Fair and were lost in the chaos of other, more popular cultural exhibits.

Officially, the games lasted for four and a half months; in fact, James Edward Sullivan tried to hold an event every day for the duration of the fair. The Olympic events were again mixed with other side sporting events, but Sullivan called all his sports events “Olympic.” The IOC later declared that only 94 of these events were Olympic Games.

The participants totaled 651 athletes – 645 men and 6 women representing 12 countries. However, only 42 events (less than half) actually included athletes who were not from the United States.

The marathon was the most bizarre event of the Games. It was run in inhumanly hot weather, over dirty roads, with horses and automobiles clearing the way and creating dust clouds.

A Thomas Hicks photo, a season pass, a regular ticket and a press pass show the paper treasures of this era!

The first to arrive at the finish line was Frederick Lorz, who actually rode part of the distance in a car (!).Frederick started the race with the rest of the athletes but not long after the 9th mile he dropped out. In order to retrieve his clothes, he rode on a car and headed to the finish line. But fate plays strange games sometimes and the car broke down on the 19th mile! Having no other choice he re-entered the race and jogged to the finish line and was announced winner of the Marathon. While on that day he was awarded the gold medal, his celebration did not last long as the scheme was unveiled and he was banned for a year by the AAU. Next year, Frederick Lorz came back and won the 1905 Boston Marathon, for real this time.

For US Thomas Hicks (a Briton running for the United States) was the first to cross the finish-line legally, after having received several doses of strychnine sulfate (a common rat poison, which arouses the nervous system in small doses) mixed with brandy from his trainers. No anti-doping control back then! He was supported by his trainers when he crossed the finish, but is still considered the winner. Hicks had to be carried off the track immediately after the run. He was so exhausted that possibly would have died in the stadium. But treated by several doctors he came back next year.

The Worlds Fair was scheduled to open in late 1903, which would have been the 100th anniversary of the Louisiana Purchase. However because of the preparations for the Olympic games the fair opening was delayed.

Stamps issued before and during the 3rd Olympics in St. Louis.

Before and during the expo and the Games were issued The Louisiana Purchase Exposition Stamps. The First Day of issue for this series of Postage was April 30, 1904. They were issued to promote the exposition.

On the stamps was depicted: Robert Livingston, who served as a delegate of New York and as a delegate to the Constitution Convention. Engraved image of Livingston is taken from a Gilbert Stuart (1783-1872) oil painting of 179. President Thomas Jefferson on 2c Issue. He was the architect of the Louisiana. James Monroe 3c Issue. This issue marked the first appearance of James Monroe on US Postage. Louisiana Purchase Map 10c Issue. This issue depicts an engraved map of the United States, showing the territory of the Louisiana Purchase in darker color, with the year of the purchase, “1803”, inscribed across the face of this area. The Bureau of Engraving and Printing printed only 4,011,200 of these issues and consequently surviving examples have been scarce, making it the most valuable stamp of this series to this day.

A stereo-view card along with the Olympics Award!

As today November 23, 1904 3rd Olympic games Closing ceremony in St. Louis took place!

The Olympics is an event that attracts a lot of people. To watch, to participate voluntarily, to share the athletes sorrow or joy, to …collect. Paper material form all Modern Olympics since 1986 are collected frantically!

Some paper ideas from the same date from the past!
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Welcome eCharta Shops

Today we are happy to announce a new exciting feature. As of this week, all sellers on eCharta are owners of an eCharta Shop! The eCharta shop is your own personal shop, provided by eCharta for free.

In your shop, your customers can find all your listings collected in one place and organized in categories that meet your needs.

Your shop comes with its own built-in search engine, meaning that your customers can search through your collections and find items of their interest without any hassle. Furthermore, you can choose from 12 marvellous color sets to give a personal touch on your Shop Front.

Your Shop Front piece by piece

The Shop Card is an important identification element of your shop. As a shop owner you can choose a shop name that best matches your business and you can add your own description to communicate what you sell and what your Shop is all about. An important element of the Shop Card is the Shop Logo. The Shop Logo is different than your personal account avatar.

Each business is not the same as the next. The eCharta Shop provides you with the flexibility to add your own Shop Categories in order to organize your listings the way it better fits your own needs.

In the Shop Showcase, your customers can see 8 listings, randomly chosen from your Shop.

Stay tuned, as more exciting features are coming on eCharta

Chris for eCharta

Bolero by Maurice Ravel

Well, as of today in 1963 the President Kennedy assassinated. We were ready to write for it showing a lot of paper items related with the assassination. But then again we thought: macabre news that everyone will mention today, on Thanksgiving day.   

So we decided to write about music! Write about Joseph-Maurice Ravel the French composer known especially for his melodies, orchestral and instrumental textures and effects and his Boléro.

Ravel was born in the Basque town of Ciboure, France, near Biarritz, close to the border with Spain, in 1875. His mother, Marie Delouart, was of Basque descent and grew up in Madrid, Spain, while his father, Joseph Ravel, was a Swiss inventor and industrialist from French Haute-Savoie.

1928 Ravel made a four-month concert tour in North America, for a promised minimum of $10,000 (approximately $135,349, if we also make inflation adjustments). Ravel conducted most of the leading orchestras in the U.S. from coast to coast and visited twenty-five cities receiving a standing ovation. New Orleans visit caused him to include some jazz elements in a few of his later compositions.

After returning to France, Ravel composed his most famous and controversial orchestral work Boléro, originally called Fandango. Ravel called it “an experiment in a very special and limited direction”.

In 1928 on 22 November in Paris, “Bolero” by Maurice Ravel was first performed publicly.

It’s amazing the quantity and quality of paper items you can find about music! Small sheets or whole orchestra scores, even rare handwritten ones, photographs, stamps, postcards and so on. Music lovers be prepared: a lot of “music” paper comes to eCharta!

Some paper ideas from the same date from the past!

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Verrazano Narrows Bridge

Giovanni da Verrazzano (1485–1528) was an Italian explorer of North America, in the service of the French crown. He is well-known as the first European since the Norse expeditions to North America around AD 1000 to travel and explore the Atlantic coast of North America between the Carolinas and Newfoundland, including New York Harbor in 1524. The bridge over the opening of New York harbor is among his several eponymous tributes.

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge was conceived nearly a century before it was built. An article in the Richmond County Gazette in 1869, prophesied the day was not “far distant when a bridge will be built across the Narrows from the lighthouse to Fort Hamilton in Long Island.”

But the bridge’s truss is erected in 1963. The final price tag for the 2.2-mile-long span – at the time, the largest suspension bridge in the world – was placed at $32 million.

In August 1964, the upper deck of the bridge was paved, and as today, on November 21st 1964 the bridge was officially opened to the public. On Nov. 23, the Post Office issued a commemorative stamp featuring the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge.

You can find a lot of paper memorabilia about the bridge; accurately about any bridge! There are many collectors with bridge thematic collections of stamps, art, postcards or engravings!

Some paper ideas from the same date from the past!

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The Old Fox

This fellow is a big deal in American baseball history.

Clark Calvin Griffith was born same date as today on November 20, 1869. Nicknamed “the Old Fox”, Griffith was an American Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher, manager and team owner. He began his MLB playing career with the St. Louis Browns (1891), Boston Reds (1891), and Chicago Colts/Orphans (1893–1900). He then served as player-manager for the Chicago White Stockings (1901–1902) and New York Highlanders (1903–1907). He retired after the 1907 season, remaining manager of the Highlanders in 1908. He managed the Cincinnati Reds (1909–1911) and Washington Senators (1912–1920), making some appearances as a player with both teams. He owned the Senators from 1920 until his death in 1955 at the age of 85.

Griffith was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1946.

How is it possible not to have many collectable paper items from this guy? Sports card collections have strong fans and enthusiasts that they pay a lot of money for a particular small piece of paper! It’s worth it!

Some paper ideas from the same date from the past!

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