Jim Morrison “opens” the DOORS!

A well know poet and a DOOR member Jim Morrison was born as today December 8, in 1943.

With his real name, James Douglas “Jim” Morrison, was born in Melbourne, Florida, to future Rear Admiral George Stephen Morrison and Clara Morrison. He was of Irish and Scottish descent.

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Recognized as an American singer-songwriter and poet, best remembered as the lead singer of Los Angeles rock band The Doors. Following The Doors’ explosive rise to fame in 1967, Morrison developed a severe alcohol and drug dependency that culminated in his death at the age of 27 in Paris. He is alleged to have died of a heroin overdose, but as no autopsy was performed, the exact cause of his death is still disputed. doors_2Morrison was well known for improvising spoken word poetry passages that he was often performed while the band played live. Due to his wild personality and performances, he is regarded by critics and fans as one of the most iconic, charismatic and pioneering frontmen of a group in rock music history. Morrison was ranked number 47 on Rolling Stone’s list of the “100 Greatest Singers of All Time”, and number 22 on Classic Rock Magazine’s “50 Greatest Singers In Rock”!

He is a legend in Rock n Roll era. Everyone will remember Jim. Though paper memorabilia or not…

Some paper ideas from the same date from the past!

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Mark Twain’s birthday!

November 30, 1835, Mark Twain was born! Happy birthday Mark, wherever you are…

It’s really very hard to say just a few things about the life of this gigantic American writer. So we just write a tiny summary of his exciting life and we propose very few paper suggestions from the millions are in existence!portraits

Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910), better known by his pen name Mark Twain,was an American writer and humorist. He is most noted for his novel The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) and its sequel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885),the latter frequently called “the Great American Novel.”stamps

Twain grew up in Hannibal, Missouri, which would later offer the setting for Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer. He apprenticed with a printer. He also worked as a typesetter and contributed articles to his older brother Orion’s newspaper. After working as a printer in various cities, he became a master riverboat pilot on the Mississippi River before heading west to join Orion. He was a disappointment at gold mining, so he next turned to journalism. While a reporter, he wrote a humorous story, “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County,” which became very popular and brought nationwide attention. His lectures were also well received. Twain finally had found his calling.

He accomplished great success as a writer and public speaker. His wit, sarcasm and satire earned admiration from critics and nobles, and he was a friend to presidents, artists, industrialists, and European royalty.

He lacked financial acumen, and though he made a great deal of money from his writings and lectures, he misspent it on various ventures, in particular the Paige Compositor, and was forced to declare bankruptcy. With the help of Henry Huttleston Rogers he eventually overcame his financial troubles. Twain worked hard to enbookssure that all of his creditors were paid in full, even though his bankruptcy had relieved him of the legal duty.

Twain was born during a visit by Halley’s Comet, and he predicted that he would “go out with it” as well. He died the day following the comet’s subsequent return. He was acclaimed as the “greatest American humorist of his age,” and William Faulkner called Twain “the father of American literature.”

Some paper ideas from the same date from the past!

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1904 St. Louis 3rd Olympic games

The map, the official poster and a nice postcard from the Olympics in St. Louis

The 1904 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the III Olympiad, was an international multi-sport event which was celebrated in St. Louis, Missouri, in the United States from July 1 to November 23, 1904, at what is now known as Francis Field on the campus of Washington University in St. Louis. St. Louis organizers repeated the mistakes made at the 1900 Summer Olympics organized in Paris. Competitions were compacted to a side-show of the World’s Fair and were lost in the chaos of other, more popular cultural exhibits.

Officially, the games lasted for four and a half months; in fact, James Edward Sullivan tried to hold an event every day for the duration of the fair. The Olympic events were again mixed with other side sporting events, but Sullivan called all his sports events “Olympic.” The IOC later declared that only 94 of these events were Olympic Games.

The participants totaled 651 athletes – 645 men and 6 women representing 12 countries. However, only 42 events (less than half) actually included athletes who were not from the United States.

The marathon was the most bizarre event of the Games. It was run in inhumanly hot weather, over dirty roads, with horses and automobiles clearing the way and creating dust clouds.

A Thomas Hicks photo, a season pass, a regular ticket and a press pass show the paper treasures of this era!

The first to arrive at the finish line was Frederick Lorz, who actually rode part of the distance in a car (!).Frederick started the race with the rest of the athletes but not long after the 9th mile he dropped out. In order to retrieve his clothes, he rode on a car and headed to the finish line. But fate plays strange games sometimes and the car broke down on the 19th mile! Having no other choice he re-entered the race and jogged to the finish line and was announced winner of the Marathon. While on that day he was awarded the gold medal, his celebration did not last long as the scheme was unveiled and he was banned for a year by the AAU. Next year, Frederick Lorz came back and won the 1905 Boston Marathon, for real this time.

For US Thomas Hicks (a Briton running for the United States) was the first to cross the finish-line legally, after having received several doses of strychnine sulfate (a common rat poison, which arouses the nervous system in small doses) mixed with brandy from his trainers. No anti-doping control back then! He was supported by his trainers when he crossed the finish, but is still considered the winner. Hicks had to be carried off the track immediately after the run. He was so exhausted that possibly would have died in the stadium. But treated by several doctors he came back next year.

The Worlds Fair was scheduled to open in late 1903, which would have been the 100th anniversary of the Louisiana Purchase. However because of the preparations for the Olympic games the fair opening was delayed.

Stamps issued before and during the 3rd Olympics in St. Louis.

Before and during the expo and the Games were issued The Louisiana Purchase Exposition Stamps. The First Day of issue for this series of Postage was April 30, 1904. They were issued to promote the exposition.

On the stamps was depicted: Robert Livingston, who served as a delegate of New York and as a delegate to the Constitution Convention. Engraved image of Livingston is taken from a Gilbert Stuart (1783-1872) oil painting of 179. President Thomas Jefferson on 2c Issue. He was the architect of the Louisiana. James Monroe 3c Issue. This issue marked the first appearance of James Monroe on US Postage. Louisiana Purchase Map 10c Issue. This issue depicts an engraved map of the United States, showing the territory of the Louisiana Purchase in darker color, with the year of the purchase, “1803”, inscribed across the face of this area. The Bureau of Engraving and Printing printed only 4,011,200 of these issues and consequently surviving examples have been scarce, making it the most valuable stamp of this series to this day.

A stereo-view card along with the Olympics Award!

As today November 23, 1904 3rd Olympic games Closing ceremony in St. Louis took place!

The Olympics is an event that attracts a lot of people. To watch, to participate voluntarily, to share the athletes sorrow or joy, to …collect. Paper material form all Modern Olympics since 1986 are collected frantically!

Some paper ideas from the same date from the past!
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Charles I and Hirohito. What do they have in common?

What happened on November 19, 1928 exactly 412 years ago? Or even 84 years ago?

Charles I was the King of England, King of Scotland, and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649.

Charles was born in Dunfermline Palace, Fife, on 19 November 1600. Charles was accused of treason against England by using his power to pursue his personal interest rather than the good of England. So, the King was declared guilty at a public session on Saturday 27 January 1649 and sentenced to death. The execution took place at Whitehall on a scaffold in front of the Banqueting House. I’m sure you’re capable enough to find some of the King’s paper items!

On the other side of the Atlantic, in the same exact date – well some centuries later – TIME magazine on 19 November 1928 presented its cover in color for the first time. The subject was another monarch: Japanese Emperor Hirohito.

Hirohito, officially called in Japan Emperor Shōwa, was the 124th Emperor of Japan according to the traditional order, reigning from December 25, 1926 until his death in 1989.

You can find a lot of paper items original or reproductions on these two topics. Well, probably not Charles I manuscripts but you can make it for the TIME magazines!

Many people collect manuscripts, engravings, magazines and postage stamps. It’s really fun to collect!

Some paper ideas from the same date from the past!

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